Sex and Power in Hollywood

In my younger days, I worked in Hollywood for a bit. Long enough to understand how the system works, and to also realize that I wasn’t going to succeed there. Consequently, to a few people in my life, I’m the go-to expert when Hollywood scandals go mainstream. And thus, I attempt to explain how the ongoing Harvey Weinstein-Kevin Spacey-James Toback sexual harassment story came to be. Why working in Hollywood is so different from working in other industries.

First of all, Hollywood is not a meritocracy. While there are many talented actors, writers, and directors working in the entertainment industry, there are many more talented people who fail.

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Daily moral decisions

We live in a particularly divided time, where factions of our society have turned upon each other, and in some cases, have turned upon themselves. Political groups find themselves in internal debates, even civil wars, unsure of what causes they support. What common beliefs they hold.

For journalists, this conflict takes another dimension. Journalists hold themselves out as being more principled than the average professional. Journalists believe they must be devoted to the truth, and to reporting it ethically, even when it doing so would be personally difficult.

Yet, on the pages of the same newspaper or website, there are words written by commentators who don’t follow the same ethical standards.

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Age is not just a number

It’s not uncommon for people to say “age is just a number.” But there are at least two different meanings for the phrase.

It is quite conceivable that a middle-aged person could say the phrase “age is just a number” and either be a hero because they just ran a marathon, or be a sex offender because they’re hitting on a teenager after school.

And in both cases, the phrase is right. And wrong. Age is just a number, in the sense that any measured quantity is just that — a measurement. The classic grade school math scenario, “John has 4 apples…,” is just about applying an arbitrary number system to a random, human situation.

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Like totally the 10 Most Influential People Ever

Flipping through TV stations tonight, I happened upon a show that displayed a list of the top 10 most influential people in the world, according to the website Ranker.com. Having been exposed to Ranker.com by my favorite morning radio show, I knew that they specialized in unscientific surveys of self-selecting morons, so I didn’t initially give it much thought. But then the #10 name came up as Charles Darwin. And the #7 name was Muhammed.

Prior to that moment, it never would have occurred to me that the general public would ever put the names Darwin and Muhammed on the same list of anything.

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A personal path

I’m about to begin a very difficult period in my life. I’m going to be dealing with serious issues pertaining to the very essence of who I am.

Stuff that I shouldn’t be blogging about.

But frankly, I don’t know what else to do. I re-started this blog recently with the hope that I could form some sort of identity as a blogger and, along the way, form some sort of cohesive philosophy that might be worth discussing. I felt like I had some good ideas to share, some thoughts that other people might find interesting.

But now I don’t even know if I’m a person worth listening to.

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